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Archive for the ‘Computer Forensics’ Category

NDMP Restoration – No filer required

The restoration of data that was backed up from NetApp and EMC appliances, when those appliances have been retired, has long been a source of angst for IT departments. Do you have to retain appliances in case data is needed? Do you just accept that data is lost or that legacy hardware will have to be re-commissioned if a restoration from an NDMP backup is required?

Altirium’s “restore-on-demand” service now provides a solution with NDMP support being an integral part of Altirum’s much vaunted ADR Suite tape restoration software. Whether you have NetWorker NDMP backups from a NetApp filer or NetBackup backups from an EMC Celerra, files can be restored from your tapes direct to USB disk and returned to you quickly.

Contact Mark Sear or Laura Sangster on 01296 658737 to find how your access to your NDMP backups can be retained without the main of maintaining legacy systems.

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Computer Forensics – don’t ignore the tapes

Much Computer Forensic work is associated with data recovery from hard disk drives, USB pens and other common data storage media. Even the television drama departments appear to believe that data is stored only on this limited range of media, I don’t have a back catalogue to check against but I am pretty certain that on Spooks there has never been an analysis of a DLT or LTO tape cartridge. So what about tape? Probably the largest volume of data stored in the world is on tape, so is it of any value in forensic investigations and litigation work?

The hard disk drive in a computer system contains the most up-to date information along with other forensically valuable information such as internet history and local temporary files, so why should you bother looking at the backup tapes?

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Time someone guarded the guards?

The NHS London “Serious Untoward Incidence Report Summary for 2008-2009” makes rather interesting reading, showing how many minor incidents have resulted in large amounts of data being “mislaid”, potentially in to the hands of persons who would use it for nefarious purposes. You can currently find the incident summary here.

What seems clear is that whilst information storage has undergone a massive technological development, the care of information has been neglected to a shocking extent.

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